Lifecycle of research consists of planning, doing, publishing and reuse.

Recent articles

28.5.2020
The traditional arenas for science communication are media publicity and non-fiction writing, with the latest addition of social media channels. Researchers’ science communication plans rarely include one major form of online publicity: Wikipedia.

12.5.2020

Dealing with inappropriate feedback is not the individual’s responsibility: it involves the entire working community.

27.4.2020

If a researcher wants their findings to have an impact, they have to consider their audience’s opinions, world-view, and the challenges they face. These things might not become clear by simply reporting, but rather by engaging in dialogue.

20.4.2020

Ethical review is part of comprehensive and proactive research integrity, the aim of which is to anticipate ethical problems and risks.

15.4.2020

Science education helps to boost children’s and adults’ science know-how. It means being familiar with science, research and their importance to society.

27.3.2020

What things should be considered when thinking about publishing research data?

19.3.2020

The European Accessibility Act brings e.g. e-books and the devices and software used to read them within the remit of accessibility regulation.

4.3.2020

Metadata is condensed information about data, quick to browse and utilise.

24.2.2020

What can you tell about the initial results of research? Or about research that is partly only at the planning stage?

16.1.2020

Combining the open availability of data and data protection is a central challenge for archives in the coming years. 

10.1.2020

The production of accessible content and services is in everyone’s interests – and also a requirement specified in law.

20.11.2019

How do you bring your knowledge to the public?